One way to manage histamine intolerance is to follow a low histamine diet. This means avoiding foods that are high in histamine or that can trigger its release.

Milos Pokimica

Written By: Milos Pokimica

Medically Reviewed by: Dr. Xiùying Wáng, M.D.

Updated January 6, 2024
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Milos Pokimica is a doctor of natural medicine, clinical nutritionist, medical health and nutrition writer, and nutritional science advisor. Author of the book series Go Vegan? Review of Science, he also operates the natural health website GoVeganWay.com

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Milos Pokimica is a doctor of natural medicine, clinical nutritionist, medical health and nutrition writer, and nutritional science advisor. Author of the book series Go Vegan? Review of Science, he also operates the natural health website GoVeganWay.com

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PubMed, #vegan-diet
  • “Climate-friendly” diets from an allergy point of view
    on May 17, 2024

    Since the EAT-Lancet Commission’s call for a change in diet towards more plant-based foods, especially protein sources, this so called “Planetary Health Diet (PHD)” has been widely discussed. While for some the reduction in animal foods is not enough and vegan diets are advocated to save the climate, others are sounding the alarm that the reduction is too drastic and that the PHD makes it impossible to provide a diet that meets our needs (of essential nutrients). In addition to climate […]

  • Cardiovascular health and cancer risk associated with plant based diets: An umbrella review
    on May 15, 2024

    CONCLUSIONS: Plant-based diets appear beneficial in reducing cardiometabolic risk factors, as well as CVDs, cancer risk and mortality. However, caution should be paid before broadly suggesting the adoption of A/AFPDs since the strength-of-evidence of study results is significantly limited by the large study heterogeneity alongside the potential risks associated with potentially restrictive regimens.

  • Variables associated with owner perceptions of the health of their dog: Further analysis of data from a large international survey
    on May 15, 2024

    In a recent study (doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0265662), associations were identified between owner-reported dog health status and diet, whereby those fed a vegan diet were perceived to be healthier. However, the study was limited because it did not consider possible confounding from variables not included in the analysis. The aim of the current study was to extend these earlier findings, using different modelling techniques and including multiple variables, to identify the most important…

  • Development of the VEGANScreener, a Tool for a Quick Diet Quality Assessment among Vegans in Europe
    on May 11, 2024

    CONCLUSIONS: We elucidated the development process of the VEGANScreener, a novel diet quality screener for vegans. Future endeavors involve contrasting the VEGANScreener against benchmark diet assessment methodologies and nutritional biomarkers and testing its acceptance. Once validated, this instrument holds potential for deployment as a self-assessment application for vegans and as a preliminary dietary screening and counseling tool in healthcare settings.

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