From all known food sources rice absorbs the highest concentration of arsenic among all commonly eaten foods.

Milos Pokimica

Written By: Milos Pokimica

Medically Reviewed by: Dr. Xiùying Wáng, M.D.

Updated June 9, 2023
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Milos Pokimica is a doctor of natural medicine, clinical nutritionist, medical health and nutrition writer, and nutritional science advisor. Author of the book series Go Vegan? Review of Science, he also operates the natural health website GoVeganWay.com

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Milos Pokimica is a doctor of natural medicine, clinical nutritionist, medical health and nutrition writer, and nutritional science advisor. Author of the book series Go Vegan? Review of Science, he also operates the natural health website GoVeganWay.com

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